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Jan 21 2013 Image of the week- Off Camera Flash + Patience

I seldom use on camera flash. I honestly despise the look of flat images that lack dimension. One of the elements we concentrate on during the wedding day, as well as in my workshops, is the use of off camera light. I'll use a remote light for nearly every element of the day that requires supplemental lighting. The first dance, blessings, toasts, parent dances, and other highlights are some examples where on camera flash just wont cut it in my world. However, what about other periods of the day that aren't "highlights"?  
 
Paulina and Chris had a phenomenal chemistry. I was constantly observing them taking a moment in their own little world. It's really easy to take a breather while the main course is being served to guests, and there are a few other "lulls" during a reception when there's not much going on. However, it's these periods throughout the day that may produce some of the most compelling moments that capture the essence of the couple. The back story for this image- The main course was being served, and everyone was seated. It would have been easy for my assistant and I to get off our feet for a few minutes. However, I couldn't help but notice that Paulina and Chris were incredibly demonstrative with their affection toward one another at their table. The venue, Greystone Hall in Westchester PA is gorgeous. It's reception area is tented, but is open air all around. I knew that the stark darkness behind the bride and groom's table would make for a dramatic backdrop if lit well. I had my assistant sit behind the bride and groom. She held a snooted SB-900 with a monopod, and she pointed it at the couple for quite a while. All I did was position myself with a long lens, and waited for moments to take place. Yes, it took patience. Yes, 7-8 minutes might seem like an eternity while waiting for a moment, but it was well worth it. The image is real, the moment is real, and the off camera light gave it a dimension that you just can't get with a flash sitting on the camera. 
 
Nikon D4, Nikkor 70-200mm VRII, ISO 1600 1/60th @ F4


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